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NC Personal Injury Lawyers

North Carolina Car Accident Laws

Vehicle accidents are not uncommon throughout the state of North Carolina. Often, these incidents are relatively minor, and all parties involved are able to secure the compensation they need through insurance carriers. However, there are times when severe accidents occur that are much more complicated to handle. In some cases, car insurance carriers resist paying compensation. Regardless of whether or not a car accident is minor or severe, there are various car accident laws in North Carolina that you need to be aware of.

Reporting car accidents

North Carolina law requires any person involved in an accident to stop and call the police if the incident caused property damage, a bodily injury, or death. Failing to stop after being involved in an accident is a crime in North Carolina, and a person could face criminal penalties for failing to do so. North Carolina law also requires drivers to exchange names, phone numbers, addresses, vehicle registration numbers, and driver’s license numbers.

Car insurance requirements

Each state requires drivers to carry certain types of auto insurance. Additionally, each state mandates the minimum amount of each type of insurance that drivers must carry to remain legal on the roadway. In North Carolina, drivers are required to carry the following types of insurance:

  • Bodily injury liability coverage: Minimum $30,000 per person and $60,000 per accident
  • Property damage liability coverage: Minimum $25,000
  • Uninsured motorist bodily injury: Minimum $30,000 per person and $60,000 per accident
  • Uninsured/Underinsured motorist property damage: Minimum $25,000

Multiple parties at fault

Many states around the country operate under a comparative negligence system where drivers who are partially responsible for a crash can still recover compensation. However, North Carolina is one of only five jurisdictions in this country that still operate under a “contributory negligence” rule. This means that if a victim involved in a vehicle accident contributed to the accident that caused their injury in any way, they will not be able to recover any compensation at all, even if the other party involved is 99% responsible.

Time limit to file a claim

There is no specific timeframe in which those involved in accidents in North Carolina have to report the incident to their insurance carriers. However, every insurance carrier that operates in North Carolina has strict reporting deadlines of its own. If an accident victim fails to report the incident to the insurance carrier relatively quickly, their claim may be delayed or denied.

Additionally, the North Carolina personal injury statute of limitations is two years from the date the injury occurred. This means that car accident victims have a two-year window with which to file a lawsuit against the alleged negligent driver, or they will not be able to secure the compensation they are entitled to.

Contact a North Carolina car accident lawyer today

If you or somebody you care about has been injured in a car accident caused by the careless or negligent actions of another driver, contact the team at Price Petho & Associates P.L.L.C. as soon as possible. Our attorneys have extensive experience handling these claims, and we will work to obtain maximum compensation for every client that we take. When you need a North Carolina car accident attorney, you can contact us for a free consultation of your case by clicking here or calling 704-850-6322.

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